Events

Symposia

2017 - 8th ANNUAL WATER RESOURCES STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM – Challenging the
Status Quo

Conference Information

2016 - 7th ANNUAL WATER RESOURCES STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM - Testing the Waters: New Ideas for Policy, Regulation, & Science
Conference Information

2015 - 6th ANNUAL WATER RESOURCES STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM - Cost & Compliance: A Balancing Act
Conference information

2014 - 5th ANNUAL WATER RESOURCES STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM - "Water's Worth It™:
The Path Forward to Sustainable and Affordable Water Infrastructure."
Conference information

2013 - 4th ANNUAL WATER RESOURCES STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM - Planning for Change
Conference information

2012 - 3rd ANNUAL CLEAN WATER ACT STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM: A Holistic Approach
Conference information

2011 - 2nd ANNUAL CLEAN WATER ACT STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM: Sustainable Solutions
Conference information

2010 - 1st ANNUAL CLEAN WATER ACT STRATEGIES SYMPOSIUM: What’s Coming and How to Respond
Conference information

Other Events

Massachusetts Water Quality Standards Roundtable - January 13, 2012, Worcester, MA

Almost 70 people attended the Roundtable where the White Paper  Evaluation of Massachusetts Water Quality Criteria for Nutrients, Bacteria, and Metals was presented. The daylong event began with remarks from Congressman Jim McGovern. It included a presentation of the White Paper findings and recommendations by John Hall of Hall & Associates from Washington, DC and concluded with an afternoon strategy session. Participants came from Attleboro, Rhode Island, Springfield, the Pioneer Valley, New Hampshire, Falmouth and all points in between. The MCWRS commissioned the paper to understand the shortcomings of current standards and approaches and identify strategies for advocating for modifications. News reports nationwide and Massachusetts communities’ experiences prove that EPA continues to ratchet down limits based on questionable science. The agency ignores the escalating financial impacts to communities versus the diminishing environmental returns. The MCWRS maintains that permits must be based on sound science and cost-effective strategies that do not bankrupt communities. The White Paper was made possible by funding from the MCWRS and special contributions from several members.